Posts Tagged ‘Ariel Pink’

Sightings: Various Artists, “Regolith Vol. 1”

Thursday, July 1st, 2010

Moon Glyph is a Minneapolis-based record label that is releasing a gem of a compilation called Regolith Vol. 1 on limited edition white vinyl. The comp. features a score of local acts in a wide range of styles. A throwback surf-pop song by Velvet Davenport, in collaboration with Gary War and Ariel Pink, chugs along with a beachy rhythm and goofball lyrics under the latter artist’s trademark AM radio fidelity. There’s also more psychy tracks like “Mystical Babe” by Daughters of the Sun, where touches of dark ambient sound combine with a driving tribal beat and hazy vocals into something truly “cool.” “Regolith Vol. 1” is a fun introduction to the Minneapolis scene and well worth the time for a listen… or ten.

Velvet Davenport (ft. Ariel Pink and Gary War), “Surfer Girl” (Regolith Vol. 1, Moon Glyph)

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Daughters of the Sun, “Mystical Babe” (Regolith Vol. 1, Moon Glyph)

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Underwater Visitations Episode #4: The Big Troubles Episode

Tuesday, May 18th, 2010

Live, Big Troubles kick up such a sandstorm that it’s hard to remember that the band began as a bedroom recording project — or, rather, two separate bedroom recording projects, two hermetic hearts that began beating as one when high school buds Alex Craig and Ian Drennan got together last summer and decided to start a band. When the duo rolled up to Newtown Radio last Thursday, the station — recently fitted with a deluxe leather couch and a fridge filled with junk food and sodas — felt homey enough to bring us back to the days when the guitar-playing and songwriting half of Big Troubles had yet to round out into a full rock line-up.

Alex and Ian played out of the same guitar amplifier, sung out of the same mic, and babbled away in the kind of half-English vernacular you probably remember sharing only a few times in your life with one or two very close friends. They couldn’t seem more like two peas in a pod — which is why I was slightly disconcerted when, following the set, Alex presented us with a hand-drawn Venn diagram designed to represent their friendship: two giant circles labeled “Alex” and “Ian,” with only a tiny sliver of overlap at the center. I can’t remember what they said the middle part represented, but I think it had something to do with food. Whatever the reality of the situation may be, I like to think of the Venn diagram as a nice metaphor for the way their instruments interact in the episode you hear below: two runaway orbs of screaming guitar noise, colliding here and there into the shape of a song. At times they overlap a little too much, sharpening into points of feedback — but that’s kind of where the magic begins.

For those of you who tuned in for the first hour of last week’s show and were a little freaked out to discover a rambling discussion between a man with a heavy French accent and a panel of small children, please be cautioned: we don’t know why or how, but Underwater Visitations was hacked! Luckily, we were able to rescue the true-blue episode from the Newtown Radio archives — including a first hour of jams by Ari Stern and yours truly, and a Big Troubles-spun spool of semi-mainstream ’80s gold, which we proudly did not decide to censor.

“Underwater Visitations Episode #4: The Big Troubles Episode”

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Download the entire episode here .

Playlist after the jump.
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Sightings: Spanish Prisoners, “Los Angeles Guitar Dream”

Wednesday, September 23rd, 2009

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When people describe 21st century psychedelic music as “lo-fi,” are they talking about the ends of that music–what we hear–or the means that go into its creation? I think that most people use the term to signal a certain sound: the golden, degraded, passed-twenty-times-over-a-cassette-recorder aesthetic, minted by acts like Ariel Pink and The Skaters and forming a primary earmark of what David Keenan recently termed “hypnagogic pop.” But let us not forget that there are millenial psychedelic artists who employ equally “lo-fi” recording technologies without necessarily building a shrine to the crackle and warp of low-fidelity.
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